Write It, Work It, Publish It™

Posts tagged ‘Marketing’

5 Steps To Psych Yourself Up For Writing In the New Year.

There’s a wise saying: “Planning will not guarantee success, but it certainly increases the probability of succeeding”.

We’re all not linear writers, but the writing process is so much easier if you put a plan of action in place. Let’s first start with 5 steps to psych you up in preparation for writing your book in the New Year.

Prepare your mind for the actual task of writing – think about all the things that you know will lead you to distraction and start weaning yourself off. For example, if you know you’re tempted to check your emails every 5 minutes. Remind yourself that you are giving others, who are probably already successful, your attention, thereby, leaving you behind from becoming successful. That does the trick for me every time.

Review your daily schedule and revise it to allow you time to write. Some of you might only be able to allot fifteen minutes, or half hour increments because time is an issue. In spite of this, you can accomplish your writing goal if you’re serious about getting your book done. Make it a priority and commit to it.

Plan your writing area. If it’s the kitchen table, or home office, get it prepared for when you are ready to write. Let those around you know that, that area will be off limits for the time you’ve set. If a bustling atmosphere, like a café is your thing and helps with your creativity, that’s okay, too. Whatever works for you. The important thing is that you’re comfortable. If you’re not, you will obviously be distracted.

Plan how you will approach writing your book. Will you write an outline? This may sound basic, but as noted above, we’re all not linear writers and many of us are either not used to working with an outline, or feel that it will dampen our creative spontaneity. I advocate having an outline. It doesn’t have to be set in stone, it’s common to tweak as you go along. However, it will serve as a starting point when you sit down to write. If you don’t have a plan of sorts, when you write, the content will most likely be disorganized, leading to extensive rewrites that is unnecessarily labour intensive. So, plant the seed in your head that you will begin with an outline, no matter how brief. Your writing experience will be better for it.

Plan to market your book. Yes, I know, marketing equals selling and you don’t like to sell. But here’s the thing, if you don’t market your book, how will people know it’s out there? You may be thinking that if you publish your book via the traditional route, the publisher will do all the marketing. That is not so. The fact is publishers expect authors to already have an established platform. You don’t have to do it alone, there are tools and services to help you, but you also have to take a level of responsibility, so prep your mind for the role of marketing your book.

Write It, Work It, Publish it™

© 2012 Cherry-Ann Carew

Cherry-Ann Carew, aka The Power Writing Coach, Developmental Editor, Amazon best-selling author and Founder of Writetastic Solutions is passionate about helping aspiring fiction and non-fiction writers bring out their creative expression to write their books. Learn how her coaching and editing services can help you Write It, Work It and Publish It™ at: http://www.writetasticsolutions.com.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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How Authors Can Benefit From Relationship Marketing

A good way for you as an author to get help to increase your writing business is to develop relationship marketing. This form of relationship building derived from direct response marketing campaigns that focused on client and customer retention, rather than sales.

Since this trend expanded into the writing world, it has proved to be a tried and true way of increasing readership base to gain access to new opportunities, when advertising efforts are applied as part of relationship marketing.

Relationship marketing is essentially pulling your resources together with other authors to help learn, grow and develop your base of ideas and opportunities. Perhaps the most difficult concept for most authors to grasp is that all of your work, no matter how well written is not going to do you any good if no one reads it.

Developing a relationship strategy starts with researching Online sites, where other authors gather for the same purpose to pool their resources and ideas that will generate more publicity for their work. This type of relationship marketing for authors typically is founded on a standard website, but can extend into social networking, blogs, groups and forums.

Indeed, according to Wikipedia: “With the growth of the Internet and mobile platforms, relationship marketing has continued to evolve and move forward as technology opens more collaborative and social communication channels.”

Picture it like you would the fans of a particular series gathering to discuss and promote their favorite TV show. Such an analogy is fairly close to the social structure of working with other authors.

The ultimate goal of relationship marketing for authors is to expand reader engagement. To let your work be known outside your core group and vice versa so that everyone can benefit from having their writings seen by as broad a base of readers as possible.

Forming marketing strategies is fairly straightforward. It is exposing your work to the general author community and linking other works similar to yours on your website or online publication. Such cooperative efforts can yield effective results, as a broader audience base gets to see your work when they otherwise might not.

The social networking aspect of relationship marketing for authors gets into the tips, strategies and other inside information that can help you shape and improve your work. Having a business relationship with other authors is important to know where you stand, and what you can do to improve. Such improvement generally leads to more success outside the inner workings of your collective marketing strategy, because when readers see your advancement; this increases the chances of them recommending your writings to others.

Blogs, groups and forums are a wonderful way to keep communication lines open with other authors, see new trends in the field and even share tips and secrets that can help you improve what you are doing. Plus, social media is growing at an exponential rate, which means you can meet more talented authors to work with and new avenues emerge to connect with readers as well.

Relationship marketing for authors is an essential means of generating more support for your work. As you help other authors, the relationship will go beyond just the promotion of your work, to improving what you do and, ultimately help you to achieve your goals as a writer, which is more exposure for your books.

Write It, Work It, Publish it!

PS. I’d love to hear your views on Relationship Marketing. Please do leave a comment.

© 2012 Cherry-Ann Carew

WOULD YOU LIKE TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE, NEWSLETTER, MAGAZINE, BLOG OR WEBSITE? Please do, but ensure you include this complete resource box:

Cherry-Ann Carew, aka The Power Writing Coach, Editor, Award Finalist, Best-selling author and Founder of Writetastic Solutions is passionate about helping aspiring fiction and non-fiction writers bring out their creative expression to write their books. Learn how her coaching and editing services can help you at www.writetasticsolutions.com

3 Easy Ways To Fight Off The Minutiae That Surrounds Writing Your Book

Writing a book is a challenge, you already know that? There’s no running away from it – so much needs to be done: expanding your idea, plotting, researching character names, setting, actual writing, rewriting, editing, etc.

Then there are other essentials outside of the writing process that you need to put in place before you even publish your book, i.e. writing your pitch, synopsis, chapter breakdown, press release – all of these require a different level of writing. Then there’s marketing, more research and on and on.

Overwhelm yet with all the details that are required for the process of writing? And that’s not all. I know. I also know it’s a test of your sanity to keep focused to make everything gel… so much to do, so little focus.

So how do you create a plan of action and stick to it? More importantly, what can you do when you meander away from the plan, because being human, you will, whether due to circumstances beyond your control, or you’re just plain distracted?

How do you do it? How do you pace yourself so that you can get to the finish line? Here are 3 Easy Ways To Fight Off The Minutiae That Surrounds Writing Your Book that will help kick you into gear:

1) First, I invite you to read an article I wrote titled: Thinking About Writing Instead of Writing? 6 Steps to get you Started.

2) It’s common to become fixated on the minutiae for varying reasons. In my experience it’s usually during the planning process where many aspiring writers get bogged down. When this happens, take some time out along with deep breaths then ask:

a) What is blocking my progression?
b) What am I avoiding?
c) Am I fearful that no one would be interested in my book?
d) Most importantly, What do I want to accomplish?

If you know what the problem is you can do something about it. Pinpointing what those blockages are will allow you to move forward.
If you’re still stuck, it’s good to talk. Speak with someone who can relate to what you are working to achieve. It could be a writing coach or a group of like-minded writers or readers. If you are besieged with marketing tasks, farm them out to free yourself from those undertakings that you do not enjoy, or don’t have the time to do so you can focus on your writing. The point is you don’t have to go the journey alone. Get all the help and support you can.

Take note of question ‘d’ – it’s powerful. Once you understand what you intend to achieve from your writing labours, you’ll become inspired and step up your productivity.

3) Continue to trust in your belief that you can do it because you are unique and you have what it takes to get your message out. Whether you are writing to inspire, motivate or entertain, believe that you can, and you will.

Write It, Work It, Publish it!

© 2012 Cherry-Ann Carew

WOULD YOU LIKE TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE, NEWSLETTER, MAGAZINE, BLOG OR WEBSITE? Please do, but ensure you include this complete resource box:

Cherry-Ann Carew, aka The Power Writing Coach, Editor, Best-selling author and Founder of Writetastic Solutions is passionate about helping aspiring fiction and non-fiction writers bring out their creative expression to write their books. Learn how her coaching and editing services can help you at www.writetasticsolutions.com.

 

Your Writing Is Precious… Q & A With Author, Bitten Twice

Your writing is precious, author, Bitten Twice, reminds us. She has written multiple books during the last 3-years and I had the pleasure of doing a quick Q & Q with this talented writer. She was kind enough to share her writing experience and give some tips that we writers can learn from, whether published or unpublished.

Q. When did you decide that you wanted to be an author and is penning books your full time profession?

A. I realized I wanted to write back in 2007 when I tapped out my first novel, but I didn’t understand the ramifications of doing so until 2009. By that time I had two novels fermenting and my father’s passing triggered the need to do something with my writing. That was the time that I set the wheels in motion to become a published author.

I wish writing was a full-time job for me. I would produce much more. Right now I have a shy alter ego that works, and Bitten Twice emerges when the sun goes down.

Q. What part of the writing process excites you the most, for instance, coming up with book titles, creating characters, setting, etc.?

A. The whole thing is pretty exciting. One moment I’m sitting there in front of a blank screen and the next thing you know the letters are dancing all over the page. I have a hunk of a leading man (alive or un-dead) or a saucy leading lady. Either one of the headstrong characters seem to direct their own fate. I think the story is going one way and lo and behold the plot twists and thickens.

Q. Your predominant writing is based on vampirism, why does this genre appeal to you?

A. Ah, the illusive vampire. Vampirism is quite a curious concept. Depending on your values, religious beliefs and demography, the question of vampirism produces different thoughts. But one commonality exists throughout the variety of cultural vampires… blood is involved.  Many times when we think of the vampire we think of the European version, but many more exist.

The genre appeals to me personally because it is an escape from reality. Vampires can be predatory by nature; thirsting for blood. They often have supernatural powers or elements along with sexual allure.

Think of a gentleman in your life today. Imagine if he had a couple of hundred years or more to perfect his abilities to interface with us women. How perfect is that? Knowing when to say all the right things, make the right moves, and possibly when to let us win. Many of the vampires that I work with in my stories have been around for a while and they don’t always get it right the first time, but you can believe they know how to make amends.

Q. Over the last 3-years, you have published 3 books from the Macedo Ink Series, one stand-alone and numerous short stories. What has this achievement done for your confidence?

A. You can’t see me right now, but I’m smiling like I’ve been possessed by the Cheshire Cat. It has been a confidence booster to see that the books have been so well received. In the beginning I was quite timid about releasing my book to the world. So many questions… “What if people didn’t like it? What if they sneered? What if…?”

Well the “what if’s” came and went. Some people loved it, some liked it, and some eh! For me, the majority of readers has embraced the books and has been kind enough to leave feedback in some form or fashion along the way. This feedback has given me the courage to keep writing. Knowing that there are folks out there that are loving the books in the same way that I am enjoying writing them gives me the motivation to continue tapping out the crazy plots and sort out all of the voices that churn in my head.

Q. What steps do you take to market and promote your books, and in your view, how important is marketing and promotion for an author?

A. Marketing and promotion is key. The writing of the book has turned out to be the easiest part. The marketing and promotion is an ongoing and never ending activity. As a self-published author with a limited marketing budget, I always have to be on the lookout for an opportunity to self-promote. Marketing is literally a full-time job in itself.

I use social media to help me. I have a blog that I’m semi-consistent with and I link that to my Facebook and Twitter account. I also use LinkedIn to surround myself with like-minded individuals to increase my circle of influence. If you can find authors in your genre you can guest blog to help promote each other. I don’t do too much on Google+ or Stumble Upon, though once in a while I’ll get an urge to go on there.

I’m a lifetime member of the Florida Writer Association (FWA), so I network with them heavily. Other than that, I use online reader groups to make comments. I try to meet people when I’m out and about and leave flyers in bookstores or coffee shops. I definitely brand; my name is a conversation starter.

Let me not forget the contest that’s currently going on at Goodreads.com. Ten (10) copies of ‘As Blood Rages’ are being given away for FREE. Go here to enter.

Q. Are you involved in any writing groups/community? If so, does this form of interaction help you as an author?

A. I just started a Pembroke Pines chapter of a writing group for FWA. It’s a small group right now, but I’m looking forward to growing it. Writing groups are an excellent means of strengthening your novel/writing. You have instant beta readers who can help you with critiques, they can also help motivate you to reach your goals, help you through writer’s block.

You know in emotional times, both in crisis or extreme happiness you need to engulf yourself with friends to share the emotion. Writing is no different. Who else but a writer will understand the extreme happiness associated with the sale of the first book, or the confusion at the sight of a returned eBook?

Q. What advice would you give to aspiring writers?

A. Hone your craft. Keep an open mind. Your writing is precious to you; however, you are too close to be objective. Embrace any criticism from those who are kind enough to give it and learn from it. Know where you want to be as a writer, set achievable goals and work towards them. Develop a sense of urgency and priority. Most of all, understand that no one will ever acknowledge you as a writer unless you recognize the writer in you first and meet the primary requirement – to write.

Thank you Bitten Twice for taking time out of your busy schedule to share your experiences with readers. I enjoyed our time together and thank you, too, for the solid tips.

To learn more about Bitten Twice, visit her website at: http://www.bitten2ice.com/

Write It, Work It, Publish it!

© 2012 Cherry-Ann Carew

WOULD YOU LIKE TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE, NEWSLETTER, MAGAZINE, BLOG OR WEBSITE? Please do, but ensure you include this complete resource box:

Cherry-Ann Carew, aka The Power Writing Coach, Editor, Best-selling author and Founder of Writetastic Solutions is passionate about helping aspiring fiction and non-fiction writers bring out their creative expression to write their books. Learn how her coaching and editing services can help you at http://www.writetasticsolutions.com.

Which Should You Pitch To An Agent First – A Query Or Proposal?

Writing a book proposal is the first step to selling your book and this includes fiction. Many novice writers miss this vital step. Furthermore, there are ground rules to adhere to and a systematic approach you must take when reaching out to an agent. So, which should you pitch to an agent first, a query letter or a proposal?

As a general rule, you submit a query letter first. This requirement is not set in stone; you can choose to present your proposal to an agent without first querying. However, it’s best to query first, as you can establish a relationship with the agent, especially if it’s your first book.

What should your query letter to an agent include? Your query letter should make a convincing and, or, compelling case of your book’s concept. And you must do your utmost to summarise your concept in one paragraph. Brevity is key.

This may seem a daunting, maybe even an impossible undertaking, but it’s so important to refine the concept. With the hundreds of queries agents receive on a daily basis, yours, like the many others, will get a blink of an eye and must, therefore, be irresistible to hook him. Furthermore, if you get beyond the flicker of his eyelid, this is what he will use to champion your book to the editor, who will in turn use it to convince the deciding parties—usually the publication board—that your book has worth.

In addition, it could be used by the publisher’s sales rep to get your book on to book store shelves and on the back cover (jacket) of your book to encourage readers to buy it.

Next, note the market potential for your book, including who the readers are and what competition you will face. This gives a point of reference for current consumer buying habits in the genre for which you write. And you must demonstrate why you are the person to write the book.

Create a detailed proposal that includes your vision for your book, estimated word count, the books time line i.e. when you plan on finishing it, an outline and a sample chapter. If your sample chapter will be ten or less pages, two or three sample chapters may be required, as well as chapter summaries.

Include what your book is about, what is the message or solution it will provide to readers, who your audience is, what makes your book different from others, how you will market it, will you sell to a special market? Will you include endorsements? Will you have someone write the foreword? Don’t forget to include your bio.

Another question to consider is should you write the proposal or the query letter first? I would suggest you write the proposal. The reason is, once your proposal is in place, you will lift details from it to craft your query. Besides, if you nab the agent’s interest, he will request the proposal and you would be wise to forward it to him immediately, while your query is fresh in his memory.

Write It, Work It, Publish it!

© 2011 Cherry-Ann Carew

WOULD YOU LIKE TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE, NEWSLETTER, MAGAZINE, BLOG OR WEBSITE? Please do, but ensure you include this complete resource box:

Cherry-Ann Carew, aka The Power Writing Coach, Editor, Best-selling author and Founder of Writetastic Solutions is passionate about helping aspiring fiction and non-fiction writers bring out their creative expression to write their books. Learn how her coaching and editing services can help you at www.writetasticsolutions.com.

 

 

An Author’s Love Affair with Writing – Cherry-Ann Carew is Author of the Month

Author Of The Month

“An Author’s Love Affair with Writing” ~ Author Cherry-Ann Carew

As a passionate author, writer, and reader, one could call Cherry-Ann Carew’s relationship with writing a long lasting love affair, not to mention an intense passion between herself and reading. It’s been one passionate rollercoaster after the next and she hasn’t stopped yet to take a breather.

Click here to read full article.

What Every Novice Writer Should Know Before Publishing Their Book

While in a writing forum earlier this week, someone asked the question: self-publishing versus traditional? A few writers shared their personal experiences and views on both counts. However, one response caught my attention because the information imparted was misleading.

Quote

When you do traditional publishing, your manuscript needs to be perfect. You will spend a lot of time quering agents.  However, once your manuscript sells, the publisher will handle all the marketing and you’ll make decent money.

When you self publish, your manuscript doesn’t need to be perfect (although it still should be) and it is faster because you don’t have to go through an agent.  The downside is you have to do your own marketing and there is no guarantee you’ll make money.

Unquote

Ouch! As someone who has been following the trends of the writing and publishing industry for years, I have seen many changes, and one of those is marketing. Gone are the days when publishers handled all the marketing for an author.

My response was that when writing a book, there are many things to consider before making a decision, regardless whether a writer chooses to self-publish or take the traditional route.

What every novice writer should know before publishing their book if taking the traditional route, is it’s a misconception that when your manuscript is accepted by a publisher, they will do all the marketing, and you will receive a huge advance and become rich. Not so, there are stages, processes and requirements. One of the major requirements is having your own marketing platform – that is key to selling books. If you do not have this, it could be problematic, no matter how brilliant your writing is. Of course, one can get lucky, but that one writer is far and few in between. Many publishers now ask that you include a marketing strategy in your proposal for both fiction and non- fiction.

You need to have a platform, if not agents and publishers will most likely reject you. Further, people will not know your book is out there, hence, no sales.

On the topic of self-publishing, another misconception is your writing doesn’t have to be well written. Self-publishing is simply another avenue.  If you wish to be taken seriously as a writer, and make writing a career, whether self-publishing or not, your manuscript has to be the best it can be, if not, readers will not buy your next book if they find the first one littered with errors, bad structure, etc.

As noted above, there are many things to consider before writing or publishing your book that requires planning and research. Doing due diligence will assist you to make an informed decision as to which publishing route may best suit you.

By the way, I do believe the author of the above quote meant: You will spend a lot of time querying agents.

Write It, Work It, Publish it!

© 2011 Cherry-Ann Carew

 

WOULD YOU LIKE TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE, NEWSLETTER, MAGAZINE, BLOG OR WEBSITE? Please do, but ensure you include this complete resource box:

Cherry-Ann Carew, aka The Power Writing Coach, Editor, Founder of Writetastic Solutions and best-selling author, helps fiction and non-fiction writers with their creative expression to add value to their books. Learn how her coaching and editing services can help you with your book at www.writetasticsolutions.com.

 

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